pet death from mold

pet poisoning
CERTIFIED CLINICAL  INDUSTRIAL HYGIENSTS
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ORANGE SULLIVAN  ROCKLAND MANHATTAN WESTCHESTER
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BUCKS PIKE   MONROE ALLEGHENY LEHIGH    NORTHAMPTON   CARBON

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mycological intitute mold in human habitations
ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO SMOKE CONTAMINATION- ALLERGY-TOXICITY

For a new home or renting tenants, occupants and landlords. Test to see if your units or townhouses have been contaminated with toxic tobacco smoke by adjacent tenants and/or occupants via vents, floor, wall or ceiling. You have a lawful right not to be exposed to sickening tobacco smoke,mold toxins, poisons or other contaminants. You are paying for a healthy, safe and enjoyable home to be contamination free.

We investigate and test for the presence of tobacco smoke for medical, contractual and forensic legal purposes.
YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO RENT OR LEASE A SMOKE FREE HOME. NEIGHBORING UNITS ARE NOT TO ALLOW TOXINS INTO YOUR HOME

WE INVESTIGATE AND REPORT NICOTINE EXPOSURE RISKS PRESENT FOR MEDICAL OR LEGAL NEEDS

Female Hypersensitivity including
Physiological and Neurological Response
Females are far more sensitive, especially and even more so when pregnant. They are more sensitive than males due to the differences in hormone and enzymes. Our clinical hygienists and related medical expert have seen countless cases where males of the home did not have any reaction when their, mate and mom had physical or neurological responses to indoor risk factors- yes, she is the "canary in the coal mine". In these cases it was only a matter of time before the male becomes so diseased. This also often attributed doe to in cases of being a parent the male or even the males being at home will be exposed for longer periods of time. We find every case to be very different and highly be host factor dependent

A single inhalation, or dermal contact may at times trigger a severe allergic response requiring hospitalization in some patients, especially in those with immune disorders, or in the atopic/hypersensitive patient. Our investigations target such agents, and have and will identify the presence to tobacco exposure and many other toxicities in nearly all cases, being case factor and host immune status specific.

Nicotine Exposure Risks

Tobacco causes cancer, may trigger serious respiratory response and other diseases with chronic and even with low dose long tern exposure. There is no known safe level of tobacco exposure.

Secondhand smoke harms children and adults, and the only way to fully protect nonsmokers is to eliminate smoking in all homes, work sites, and public places.1,2,3

You can take steps to protect yourself and your family from secondhand smoke, such as making your home and vehicles smokefree.2,3

Separating smokers from nonsmokers, opening windows, or using air filters does not prevent people from breathing secondhand smoke.1,2,3

Most exposure to secondhand smoke occurs in homes and workplaces.2,3

People are also exposed to secondhand smoke in public places—such as in restaurants, bars, and casinos—as well as in cars and other vehicles.2,3

People with lower income and lower education are less likely to be covered by smoke free laws in work sites, restaurants, and bars.4

What Is Secondhand Smoke?

  • Secondhand smoke is smoke from burning tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars, or pipes.1,5,6
  • Secondhand smoke also is smoke that has been exhaled, or breathed out, by the person smoking.5,6
  • Tobacco smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals, including hundreds that are toxic and about 70 that can cause cancer.1

Secondhand Smoke Harms Children and Adults

  • There is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke causes numerous health problems in infants and children, including more frequent and severe asthma attacks, respiratory infections, ear infections, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).1,2,6
  • Since 1964, approximately 2,500,000 nonsmokers have died from health problems caused by exposure to secondhand smoke.1

Sudden Infant Death - Health Effects on Infant and Children

In children, secondhand smoke causes the following:1,2,3

  • Ear infections
  • More frequent and severe asthma attacks
  • Respiratory symptoms (for example, coughing, sneezing, and shortness of breath)
  • Respiratory infections (bronchitis and pneumonia)
  • A greater risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)
tobacco effects babies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Health Effects in Adults

In adults who have never smoked, secondhand smoke can cause:

  • Heart disease
    • For nonsmokers, breathing secondhand smoke has immediate harmful effects on the heart and blood vessels.1,3
    • It is estimated that secondhand smoke caused nearly 34,000 heart disease deaths each year during 2005–2009 among adult nonsmokers in the United States.1
  • Lung cancer1,7
    • Secondhand smoke exposure caused more than 7,300 lung cancer deaths each year during 2005–2009 among adult nonsmokers in the United States.1
  • Stroke1
  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [accessed 2017 Feb 21].
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010 [accessed 2017 Feb 21].
  3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006 [accessed 2017 Feb 21].
  4. Huang J, King BA, Babb SD, Xu X, Hallett C, Hopkins M. Sociodemographic Disparities in Local Smoke-Free Law Coverage in 10 States. American Journal of Public Health 2015;105(9):1806–13 [cited 2017 Feb 21].
  5. Institute of Medicine. Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Cardiovascular Effects: Making Sense of the Evidence  [PDF–707.47 KB]. Washington: National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, 2009 [accessed 2017 Feb 21].
  6. National Toxicology Program. Report on Carcinogens, Fourteenth Edition. Research Triangle Park (NC): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, 2016 [accessed 2017 Feb 21].
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital Signs: Nonsmokers' Exposure to Secondhand Smoke—United States, 1999–2008. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2010;59(35):1141–6 [accessed 2017 Feb 21].
  8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vital Signs: Disparities in Nonsmokers' Exposure to Secondhand Smoke—United States, 1999–2012. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2015;64(4):103–8 [accessed 2017 Feb 21].
  9. Wilson KM, Klein JD, Blumkin AK, Gottlieb M, Winickoff JP.Tobacco Smoke Exposure in Children Who Live in Multiunit Housing. [PDF–575 KB] Pediatrics 2011:127(1):85-92 [accessed 2017 Feb 21].
  10. Arheart KL, Lee DJ, Dietz NA, Wilkinson JD, Clark III JD, LeBlanc WG, Serdar B, Fleming LE. Declining Trends in Serum Cotinine Levels in U.S. Worker Groups: The Power of Policy. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2008;50(1):57–63 [cited 2017 Feb 21].